Echinacea Purpurea

This member of the Compositae (daisy) family, sometimes referred to as Purple Coneflower, was popularized by European research commencing in 1939 conducted primarily on the fresh pressed aerial portions of the flowering plant. Echinacea purpurea is scarce in the wild but is considered native to Arkansas and Missouri and traveled eastward after 1968. It is drought and disease tolerant and therefore very easy to cultivate. All Echinacea purpurea currently used in commercial preparations is cultivated.

Product Image

What is Echinacea Purpurea Used For?

View Important Precautions

Product Image

Traditional Health Benefits of Echinacea Purpurea

Highlights

What is Echinacea Purpurea Used For?

View Important Precautions

Traditional Health Benefits of Echinacea Purpurea

Disclaimer
This information in our Herbal Reference Guide is intended only as a general reference for further exploration, and is not a replacement for professional health advice. This content does not provide dosage information, format recommendations, toxicity levels, or possible interactions with prescription drugs. Accordingly, this information should be used only under the direct supervision of a qualified health practitioner such as a naturopathic physician.