Hyssop

Aromatically complex and visually stimulating, this ancient member of the mint family hails from the eastern Mediterranean to central Asia. There are 10-12 species of Hyssop, but the most widely cultivated and naturalized species is officinalis. Hyssop is mentioned in the Bible, and by ancient Greek physician; Dioscorides among other venerable places in historical literature. The whole plant when distilled yields an aromatic essential oil that is used in perfumery (eau de cologne), in liqueurs (chartreuse, absinthe), and aromatherapy. The flowers attract bees, butterflies, and other pollinators and the honey produced from Hyssop flower nectar is sublime.

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What is Hyssop Used For?

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Traditional Health Benefits of Hyssop

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What is Hyssop Used For?

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Traditional Health Benefits of Hyssop

Disclaimer
This information in our Herbal Reference Guide is intended only as a general reference for further exploration, and is not a replacement for professional health advice. This content does not provide dosage information, format recommendations, toxicity levels, or possible interactions with prescription drugs. Accordingly, this information should be used only under the direct supervision of a qualified health practitioner such as a naturopathic physician.