Oregon Grape

Mahonia aquifolium is a native plant on the North American west coast from British Columbia to northern California, occurring mostly in the understory of Douglas-Fir forests. This plant is not a grape at all, but gets its name from the purple fruits that form following a robust yellow flower cluster. It resemble a holly bush, in fact the botanic name aquifolium means that the leaf is holly-like and is derived from the Roman name for holly, aquifolium, 'prickly leaved'. Other names include; Blue Barberry, Holly Barberry, Holly Mahonia, and Mountain Grape. Oregon grape was introduced into medical practice in 1886 by the Pharmaceutical firm, Parke Davis & Company and was popular with physicians treating skin conditions. It was official in the US Pharmacopeia from 1905 to 1916. It contains many alkaloids chiefly Berberine, which has a strong, yellow, color. This and similar species were used to dye wool, leather and wood in addition to being used to address digestive complaints and skin issues.

Product Image

What is Oregon Grape Used For?

View Important Precautions

Product Image

Traditional Health Benefits of Oregon Grape

Highlights

What is Oregon Grape Used For?

View Important Precautions

Traditional Health Benefits of Oregon Grape

Disclaimer
This information in our Herbal Reference Guide is intended only as a general reference for further exploration, and is not a replacement for professional health advice. This content does not provide dosage information, format recommendations, toxicity levels, or possible interactions with prescription drugs. Accordingly, this information should be used only under the direct supervision of a qualified health practitioner such as a naturopathic physician.